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2014


Multi-View Priors for Learning Detectors from Sparse Viewpoint Data
Multi-View Priors for Learning Detectors from Sparse Viewpoint Data

Pepik, B., Stark, M., Gehler, P., Schiele, B.

International Conference on Learning Representations, April 2014 (conference)

Abstract
While the majority of today's object class models provide only 2D bounding boxes, far richer output hypotheses are desirable including viewpoint, fine-grained category, and 3D geometry estimate. However, models trained to provide richer output require larger amounts of training data, preferably well covering the relevant aspects such as viewpoint and fine-grained categories. In this paper, we address this issue from the perspective of transfer learning, and design an object class model that explicitly leverages correlations between visual features. Specifically, our model represents prior distributions over permissible multi-view detectors in a parametric way -- the priors are learned once from training data of a source object class, and can later be used to facilitate the learning of a detector for a target class. As we show in our experiments, this transfer is not only beneficial for detectors based on basic-level category representations, but also enables the robust learning of detectors that represent classes at finer levels of granularity, where training data is typically even scarcer and more unbalanced. As a result, we report largely improved performance in simultaneous 2D object localization and viewpoint estimation on a recent dataset of challenging street scenes.

reviews pdf Project Page [BibTex]

2014

reviews pdf Project Page [BibTex]


NRSfM using Local Rigidity
NRSfM using Local Rigidity

Rehan, A., Zaheer, A., Akhter, I., Saeed, A., Mahmood, B., Usmani, M., Khan, S.

In Proceedings Winter Conference on Applications of Computer Vision, pages: 69-74, open access, IEEE , Steamboat Springs, CO, USA, March 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Factorization methods for computation of nonrigid structure have limited practicality, and work well only when there is large enough camera motion between frames, with long sequences and limited or no occlusions. We show that typical nonrigid structure can often be approximated well as locally rigid sub-structures in time and space. Specifically, we assume that: 1) the structure can be approximated as rigid in a short local time window and 2) some point pairs stay relatively rigid in space, maintaining a fixed distance between them during the sequence. We first use the triangulation constraints in rigid SFM over a sliding time window to get an initial estimate of the nonrigid 3D structure. We then automatically identify relatively rigid point pairs in this structure, and use their length-constancy simultaneously with triangulation constraints to refine the structure estimate. Unlike factorization methods, the structure is estimated independent of the camera motion computation, adding to the simplicity and stability of the approach. Further, local factorization inherently handles significant natural occlusions gracefully, performing much better than the state-of-the art. We show more stable and accurate results as compared to the state-of-the art on even short sequences starting from 15 frames only, containing camera rotations as small as 2 degree and up to 50% missing data.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Model-based Anthropometry: Predicting Measurements from 3D Human Scans in Multiple Poses
Model-based Anthropometry: Predicting Measurements from 3D Human Scans in Multiple Poses

Tsoli, A., Loper, M., Black, M. J.

In Proceedings Winter Conference on Applications of Computer Vision, pages: 83-90, IEEE , March 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Extracting anthropometric or tailoring measurements from 3D human body scans is important for applications such as virtual try-on, custom clothing, and online sizing. Existing commercial solutions identify anatomical landmarks on high-resolution 3D scans and then compute distances or circumferences on the scan. Landmark detection is sensitive to acquisition noise (e.g. holes) and these methods require subjects to adopt a specific pose. In contrast, we propose a solution we call model-based anthropometry. We fit a deformable 3D body model to scan data in one or more poses; this model-based fitting is robust to scan noise. This brings the scan into registration with a database of registered body scans. Then, we extract features from the registered model (rather than from the scan); these include, limb lengths, circumferences, and statistical features of global shape. Finally, we learn a mapping from these features to measurements using regularized linear regression. We perform an extensive evaluation using the CAESAR dataset and demonstrate that the accuracy of our method outperforms state-of-the-art methods.

pdf DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

pdf DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


{Evaluation of feature-based 3-d registration of probabilistic volumetric scenes}
Evaluation of feature-based 3-d registration of probabilistic volumetric scenes

Restrepo, M. I., Ulusoy, A. O., Mundy, J. L.

In ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, 98(0):1-18, 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Automatic estimation of the world surfaces from aerial images has seen much attention and progress in recent years. Among current modeling technologies, probabilistic volumetric models (PVMs) have evolved as an alternative representation that can learn geometry and appearance in a dense and probabilistic manner. Recent progress, in terms of storage and speed, achieved in the area of volumetric modeling, opens the opportunity to develop new frameworks that make use of the {PVM} to pursue the ultimate goal of creating an entire map of the earth, where one can reason about the semantics and dynamics of the 3-d world. Aligning 3-d models collected at different time-instances constitutes an important step for successful fusion of large spatio-temporal information. This paper evaluates how effectively probabilistic volumetric models can be aligned using robust feature-matching techniques, while considering different scenarios that reflect the kind of variability observed across aerial video collections from different time instances. More precisely, this work investigates variability in terms of discretization, resolution and sampling density, errors in the camera orientation, and changes in illumination and geographic characteristics. All results are given for large-scale, outdoor sites. In order to facilitate the comparison of the registration performance of {PVMs} to that of other 3-d reconstruction techniques, the registration pipeline is also carried out using Patch-based Multi-View Stereo (PMVS) algorithm. Registration performance is similar for scenes that have favorable geometry and the appearance characteristics necessary for high quality reconstruction. In scenes containing trees, such as a park, or many buildings, such as a city center, registration performance is significantly more accurate when using the PVM.

Publisher site link (url) DOI [BibTex]

Publisher site link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Left Ventricle Segmentation by Dynamic Shape Constrained Random Walk

X. Yang, Y. Su, M. Wan, S. Y. Yeo, C. Lim, S. T. Wong, L. Zhong, R. S. Tan

In Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Accurate and robust extraction of the left ventricle (LV) cavity is a key step for quantitative analysis of cardiac functions. In this study, we propose an improved LV cavity segmentation method that incorporates a dynamic shape constraint into the weighting function of the random walks algorithm. The method involves an iterative process that updates an intermediate result to the desired solution. The shape constraint restricts the solution space of the segmentation result, such that the robustness of the algorithm is increased to handle misleading information that emanates from noise, weak boundaries, and clutter. Our experiments on real cardiac magnetic resonance images demonstrate that the proposed method obtains better segmentation performance than standard method.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2005


A quantitative evaluation of video-based {3D} person tracking
A quantitative evaluation of video-based 3D person tracking

Balan, A. O., Sigal, L., Black, M. J.

In The Second Joint IEEE International Workshop on Visual Surveillance and Performance Evaluation of Tracking and Surveillance, VS-PETS, pages: 349-356, October 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

2005

pdf [BibTex]


Inferring attentional state and kinematics from motor cortical firing rates
Inferring attentional state and kinematics from motor cortical firing rates

Wood, F., Prabhat, , Donoghue, J. P., Black, M. J.

In Proc. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, pages: 1544-1547, September 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Motor cortical decoding using an autoregressive moving average model
Motor cortical decoding using an autoregressive moving average model

Fisher, J., Black, M. J.

In Proc. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, pages: 1469-1472, September 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Fields of Experts: A framework for learning image priors
Fields of Experts: A framework for learning image priors

Roth, S., Black, M. J.

In IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, 2, pages: 860-867, June 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


On the spatial statistics of optical flow
On the spatial statistics of optical flow

(Marr Prize, Honorable Mention)

Roth, S., Black, M. J.

In International Conf. on Computer Vision, International Conf. on Computer Vision, pages: 42-49, 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Modeling neural population spiking activity with {Gibbs} distributions
Modeling neural population spiking activity with Gibbs distributions

Wood, F., Roth, S., Black, M. J.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 18, pages: 1537-1544, 2005 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


no image
Energy-based models of motor cortical population activity

Wood, F., Black, M.

Program No. 689.20. 2005 Abstract Viewer/Itinerary Planner, Society for Neuroscience, Washington, DC, 2005 (conference)

abstract [BibTex]

abstract [BibTex]

2002


Inferring hand motion from multi-cell recordings in motor cortex using a {Kalman} filter
Inferring hand motion from multi-cell recordings in motor cortex using a Kalman filter

Wu, W., Black, M. J., Gao, Y., Bienenstock, E., Serruya, M., Donoghue, J. P.

In SAB’02-Workshop on Motor Control in Humans and Robots: On the Interplay of Real Brains and Artificial Devices, pages: 66-73, Edinburgh, Scotland (UK), August 2002 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

2002

pdf [BibTex]


no image
Inferring hand motion from multi-cell recordings in motor cortex using a Kalman filter

Wu, W., Black M., Gao, Y., Bienenstock, E., Serruya, M., Donoghue, J.

Program No. 357.5. 2002 Abstract Viewer/Itinerary Planner, Society for Neuroscience, Washington, DC, 2002, Online (conference)

abstract [BibTex]

abstract [BibTex]


Probabilistic inference of hand motion from neural activity in motor cortex
Probabilistic inference of hand motion from neural activity in motor cortex

Gao, Y., Black, M. J., Bienenstock, E., Shoham, S., Donoghue, J.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 221-228, MIT Press, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Statistical learning and probabilistic inference techniques are used to infer the hand position of a subject from multi-electrode recordings of neural activity in motor cortex. First, an array of electrodes provides train- ing data of neural firing conditioned on hand kinematics. We learn a non- parametric representation of this firing activity using a Bayesian model and rigorously compare it with previous models using cross-validation. Second, we infer a posterior probability distribution over hand motion conditioned on a sequence of neural test data using Bayesian inference. The learned firing models of multiple cells are used to define a non- Gaussian likelihood term which is combined with a prior probability for the kinematics. A particle filtering method is used to represent, update, and propagate the posterior distribution over time. The approach is com- pared with traditional linear filtering methods; the results suggest that it may be appropriate for neural prosthetic applications.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Automatic detection and tracking of human motion with a view-based representation
Automatic detection and tracking of human motion with a view-based representation

Fablet, R., Black, M. J.

In European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV 2002, 1, pages: 476-491, LNCS 2353, (Editors: A. Heyden and G. Sparr and M. Nielsen and P. Johansen), Springer-Verlag , 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper proposes a solution for the automatic detection and tracking of human motion in image sequences. Due to the complexity of the human body and its motion, automatic detection of 3D human motion remains an open, and important, problem. Existing approaches for automatic detection and tracking focus on 2D cues and typically exploit object appearance (color distribution, shape) or knowledge of a static background. In contrast, we exploit 2D optical flow information which provides rich descriptive cues, while being independent of object and background appearance. To represent the optical flow patterns of people from arbitrary viewpoints, we develop a novel representation of human motion using low-dimensional spatio-temporal models that are learned using motion capture data of human subjects. In addition to human motion (the foreground) we probabilistically model the motion of generic scenes (the background); these statistical models are defined as Gibbsian fields specified from the first-order derivatives of motion observations. Detection and tracking are posed in a principled Bayesian framework which involves the computation of a posterior probability distribution over the model parameters (i.e., the location and the type of the human motion) given a sequence of optical flow observations. Particle filtering is used to represent and predict this non-Gaussian posterior distribution over time. The model parameters of samples from this distribution are related to the pose parameters of a 3D articulated model (e.g. the approximate joint angles and movement direction). Thus the approach proves suitable for initializing more complex probabilistic models of human motion. As shown by experiments on real image sequences, our method is able to detect and track people under different viewpoints with complex backgrounds.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


A layered motion representation with occlusion and compact spatial support
A layered motion representation with occlusion and compact spatial support

Fleet, D. J., Jepson, A., Black, M. J.

In European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV 2002, 1, pages: 692-706, LNCS 2353, (Editors: A. Heyden and G. Sparr and M. Nielsen and P. Johansen), Springer-Verlag , 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe a 2.5D layered representation for visual motion analysis. The representation provides a global interpretation of image motion in terms of several spatially localized foreground regions along with a background region. Each of these regions comprises a parametric shape model and a parametric motion model. The representation also contains depth ordering so visibility and occlusion are rightly included in the estimation of the model parameters. Finally, because the number of objects, their positions, shapes and sizes, and their relative depths are all unknown, initial models are drawn from a proposal distribution, and then compared using a penalized likelihood criterion. This allows us to automatically initialize new models, and to compare different depth orderings.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Implicit probabilistic models of human motion for synthesis and tracking
Implicit probabilistic models of human motion for synthesis and tracking

Sidenbladh, H., Black, M. J., Sigal, L.

In European Conf. on Computer Vision, 1, pages: 784-800, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper addresses the problem of probabilistically modeling 3D human motion for synthesis and tracking. Given the high dimensional nature of human motion, learning an explicit probabilistic model from available training data is currently impractical. Instead we exploit methods from texture synthesis that treat images as representing an implicit empirical distribution. These methods replace the problem of representing the probability of a texture pattern with that of searching the training data for similar instances of that pattern. We extend this idea to temporal data representing 3D human motion with a large database of example motions. To make the method useful in practice, we must address the problem of efficient search in a large training set; efficiency is particularly important for tracking. Towards that end, we learn a low dimensional linear model of human motion that is used to structure the example motion database into a binary tree. An approximate probabilistic tree search method exploits the coefficients of this low-dimensional representation and runs in sub-linear time. This probabilistic tree search returns a particular sample human motion with probability approximating the true distribution of human motions in the database. This sampling method is suitable for use with particle filtering techniques and is applied to articulated 3D tracking of humans within a Bayesian framework. Successful tracking results are presented, along with examples of synthesizing human motion using the model.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Robust parameterized component analysis: Theory and applications to {2D} facial modeling
Robust parameterized component analysis: Theory and applications to 2D facial modeling

De la Torre, F., Black, M. J.

In European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV 2002, 4, pages: 653-669, LNCS 2353, Springer-Verlag, 2002 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]

1993


Mixture models for optical flow computation
Mixture models for optical flow computation

Jepson, A., Black, M.

In IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR-93, pages: 760-761, New York, NY, June 1993 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The computation of optical flow relies on merging information available over an image patch to form an estimate of 2-D image velocity at a point. This merging process raises many issues. These include the treatment of outliers in component velocity measurements and the modeling of multiple motions within a patch which arise from occlusion boundaries or transparency. A new approach for dealing with these issues is presented. It is based on the use of a probabilistic mixture model to explicitly represent multiple motions within a patch. A simple extension of the EM-algorithm is used to compute a maximum likelihood estimate for the various motion parameters. Preliminary experiments indicate that this approach is computationally efficient, and that it can provide robust estimates of the optical flow values in the presence of outliers and multiple motions.

pdf tech report [BibTex]

1993

pdf tech report [BibTex]


A framework for the robust estimation of optical flow
A framework for the robust estimation of optical flow

(Helmholtz Prize)

Black, M. J., Anandan, P.

In Fourth International Conf. on Computer Vision, ICCV-93, pages: 231-236, Berlin, Germany, May 1993 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Most approaches for estimating optical flow assume that, within a finite image region, only a single motion is present. This single motion assumption is violated in common situations involving transparency, depth discontinuities, independently moving objects, shadows, and specular reflections. To robustly estimate optical flow, the single motion assumption must be relaxed. This work describes a framework based on robust estimation that addresses violations of the brightness constancy and spatial smoothness assumptions caused by multiple motions. We show how the robust estimation framework can be applied to standard formulations of the optical flow problem thus reducing their sensitivity to violations of their underlying assumptions. The approach has been applied to three standard techniques for recovering optical flow: area-based regression, correlation, and regularization with motion discontinuities. This work focuses on the recovery of multiple parametric motion models within a region as well as the recovery of piecewise-smooth flow fields and provides examples with natural and synthetic image sequences.

pdf video abstract code [BibTex]

pdf video abstract code [BibTex]


Action, representation, and purpose: Re-evaluating the foundations of computational vision
Action, representation, and purpose: Re-evaluating the foundations of computational vision

Black, M. J., Aloimonos, Y., Brown, C. M., Horswill, I., Malik, J., G. Sandini, , Tarr, M. J.

In International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, IJCAI-93, pages: 1661-1666, Chambery, France, 1993 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]

1992


Psychophysical implications of temporal persistence in early vision: A computational account of representational momentum
Psychophysical implications of temporal persistence in early vision: A computational account of representational momentum

Tarr, M. J., Black, M. J.

Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science Supplement, Vol. 36, No. 4, 33, pages: 1050, May 1992 (conference)

abstract [BibTex]

1992

abstract [BibTex]


Combining intensity and motion for incremental segmentation and tracking over long image sequences
Combining intensity and motion for incremental segmentation and tracking over long image sequences

Black, M. J.

In Proc. Second European Conf. on Computer Vision, ECCV-92, pages: 485-493, LNCS 588, Springer Verlag, May 1992 (inproceedings)

pdf video abstract [BibTex]

pdf video abstract [BibTex]