Header logo is ps


2011


no image
ISocRob-MSL 2011 Team Description Paper for Middle Sized League

Messias, J., Ahmad, A., Reis, J., Sousa, J., Lima, P.

15th Annual RoboCup International Symposium 2011, July 2011 (techreport)

Abstract
This paper describes the status of the ISocRob MSL robotic soccer team as required by the RoboCup 2011 qualification procedures. The most relevant technical and scientifical developments carried out by the team, since its last participation in the RoboCup MSL competitions, are here detailed. These include cooperative localization, cooperative object tracking, planning under uncertainty, obstacle detection and improvements to self-localization.

link (url) [BibTex]

2011

link (url) [BibTex]


Thumb xl andriluka2011
Benchmark datasets for pose estimation and tracking

Andriluka, M., Sigal, L., Black, M. J.

In Visual Analysis of Humans: Looking at People, pages: 253-274, (Editors: Moesland and Hilton and Kr"uger and Sigal), Springer-Verlag, London, 2011 (incollection)

publisher's site Project Page [BibTex]

publisher's site Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl foe2011
Fields of experts

Roth, S., Black, M. J.

In Markov Random Fields for Vision and Image Processing, pages: 297-310, (Editors: Blake, A. and Kohli, P. and Rother, C.), MIT Press, 2011 (incollection)

Abstract
Fields of Experts are high-order Markov random field (MRF) models with potential functions that extend over large pixel neighborhoods. The clique potentials are modeled as a Product of Experts using nonlinear functions of many linear filter responses. In contrast to previous MRF approaches, all parameters, including the linear filters themselves, are learned from training data. A Field of Experts (FoE) provides a generic, expressive image prior that can capture the statistics of natural scenes, and can be used for a variety of machine vision tasks. The capabilities of FoEs are demonstrated with two example applications, image denoising and image inpainting, which are implemented using a simple, approximate inference scheme. While the FoE model is trained on a generic image database and is not tuned toward a specific application, the results compete with specialized techniques.

publisher site [BibTex]

publisher site [BibTex]


Thumb xl screen shot 2012 03 13 at 2.41.46 pm
Dorsal Stream: From Algorithm to Neuroscience

Jhuang, H.

PhD Thesis, MIT, 2011 (techreport)

pdf [BibTex]


Thumb xl srf2011 2
Steerable random fields for image restoration and inpainting

Roth, S., Black, M. J.

In Markov Random Fields for Vision and Image Processing, pages: 377-387, (Editors: Blake, A. and Kohli, P. and Rother, C.), MIT Press, 2011 (incollection)

Abstract
This chapter introduces the concept of a Steerable Random Field (SRF). In contrast to traditional Markov random field (MRF) models in low-level vision, the random field potentials of a SRF are defined in terms of filter responses that are steered to the local image structure. This steering uses the structure tensor to obtain derivative responses that are either aligned with, or orthogonal to, the predominant local image structure. Analysis of the statistics of these steered filter responses in natural images leads to the model proposed here. Clique potentials are defined over steered filter responses using a Gaussian scale mixture model and are learned from training data. The SRF model connects random fields with anisotropic regularization and provides a statistical motivation for the latter. Steering the random field to the local image structure improves image denoising and inpainting performance compared with traditional pairwise MRFs.

publisher site [BibTex]

publisher site [BibTex]


Thumb xl teaser bchap
Model-Based Pose Estimation

Pons-Moll, G., Rosenhahn, B.

In Visual Analysis of Humans: Looking at People, pages: 139-170, 9, (Editors: T. Moeslund, A. Hilton, V. Krueger, L. Sigal), Springer, 2011 (inbook)

book page pdf [BibTex]

book page pdf [BibTex]

2006


Thumb xl screen shot 2012 06 06 at 11.31.38 am
Implicit Wiener Series, Part II: Regularised estimation

Gehler, P., Franz, M.

(148), Max Planck Institute, 2006 (techreport)

pdf [BibTex]

2006


Thumb xl evatr
HumanEva: Synchronized video and motion capture dataset for evaluation of articulated human motion

Sigal, L., Black, M. J.

(CS-06-08), Brown University, Department of Computer Science, 2006 (techreport)

pdf abstract [BibTex]

pdf abstract [BibTex]


Thumb xl screen shot 2012 06 06 at 11.15.02 am
Products of “Edge-perts”

Gehler, P., Welling, M.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 18, pages: 419-426, (Editors: Weiss, Y. and Sch"olkopf, B. and Platt, J.), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 2006 (incollection)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]

1999


Thumb xl paircover
Artscience Sciencart

Black, M. J., Levy, D., PamelaZ,

In Art and Innovation: The Xerox PARC Artist-in-Residence Program, pages: 244-300, (Editors: Harris, C.), MIT-Press, 1999 (incollection)

Abstract
One of the effects of the PARC Artist In Residence (PAIR) program has been to expose the strong connections between scientists and artists. Both do what they do because they need to do it. They are often called upon to justify their work in order to be allowed to continue to do it. They need to justify it to funders, to sponsoring institutions, corporations, the government, the public. They publish papers, teach workshops, and write grants touting the educational or health benefits of what they do. All of these things are to some extent valid, but the fact of the matter is: artists and scientists do their work because they are driven to do it. They need to explore and create.

This chapter attempts to give a flavor of one multi-way "PAIRing" between performance artist PamelaZ and two PARC researchers, Michael Black and David Levy. The three of us paired up because we found each other interesting. We chose each other. While most artists in the program are paired with a single researcher Pamela jokingly calls herself a bigamist for choosing two PAIR "husbands" with different backgrounds and interests.

There are no "rules" to the PAIR program; no one told us what to do with our time. Despite this we all had a sense that we needed to produce something tangible during Pamela's year-long residency. In fact, Pamela kept extending her residency because she did not feel as though we had actually made anything concrete. The interesting thing was that all along we were having great conversations, some of which Pamela recorded. What we did not see at the time was that it was these conversations between artists and scientists that are at the heart of the PAIR program and that these conversations were changing the way we thought about our own work and the relationships between science and art.

To give these conversations their due, and to allow the reader into our PAIR interactions, we include two of our many conversations in this chapter.

[BibTex]

1999

[BibTex]

1996


Thumb xl miximages
Mixture Models for Image Representation

Jepson, A., Black, M.

PRECARN ARK Project Technical Report ARK96-PUB-54, March 1996 (techreport)

Abstract
We consider the estimation of local greylevel image structure in terms of a layered representation. This type of representation has recently been successfully used to segment various objects from clutter using either optical ow or stereo disparity information. We argue that the same type of representation is useful for greylevel data in that it allows for the estimation of properties for each of several different components without prior segmentation. Our emphasis in this paper is on the process used to extract such a layered representation from a given image In particular we consider a variant of the EM algorithm for the estimation of the layered model and consider a novel technique for choosing the number of layers to use. We briefly consider the use of a simple version of this approach for image segmentation and suggest two potential applications to the ARK project

pdf [BibTex]

1996

pdf [BibTex]