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2018


Model-based Optical Flow: Layers, Learning, and Geometry
Model-based Optical Flow: Layers, Learning, and Geometry

Wulff, J.

Tuebingen University, April 2018 (phdthesis)

Abstract
The estimation of motion in video sequences establishes temporal correspondences between pixels and surfaces and allows reasoning about a scene using multiple frames. Despite being a focus of research for over three decades, computing motion, or optical flow, remains challenging due to a number of difficulties, including the treatment of motion discontinuities and occluded regions, and the integration of information from more than two frames. One reason for these issues is that most optical flow algorithms only reason about the motion of pixels on the image plane, while not taking the image formation pipeline or the 3D structure of the world into account. One approach to address this uses layered models, which represent the occlusion structure of a scene and provide an approximation to the geometry. The goal of this dissertation is to show ways to inject additional knowledge about the scene into layered methods, making them more robust, faster, and more accurate. First, this thesis demonstrates the modeling power of layers using the example of motion blur in videos, which is caused by fast motion relative to the exposure time of the camera. Layers segment the scene into regions that move coherently while preserving their occlusion relationships. The motion of each layer therefore directly determines its motion blur. At the same time, the layered model captures complex blur overlap effects at motion discontinuities. Using layers, we can thus formulate a generative model for blurred video sequences, and use this model to simultaneously deblur a video and compute accurate optical flow for highly dynamic scenes containing motion blur. Next, we consider the representation of the motion within layers. Since, in a layered model, important motion discontinuities are captured by the segmentation into layers, the flow within each layer varies smoothly and can be approximated using a low dimensional subspace. We show how this subspace can be learned from training data using principal component analysis (PCA), and that flow estimation using this subspace is computationally efficient. The combination of the layered model and the low-dimensional subspace gives the best of both worlds, sharp motion discontinuities from the layers and computational efficiency from the subspace. Lastly, we show how layered methods can be dramatically improved using simple semantics. Instead of treating all layers equally, a semantic segmentation divides the scene into its static parts and moving objects. Static parts of the scene constitute a large majority of what is shown in typical video sequences; yet, in such regions optical flow is fully constrained by the depth structure of the scene and the camera motion. After segmenting out moving objects, we consider only static regions, and explicitly reason about the structure of the scene and the camera motion, yielding much better optical flow estimates. Furthermore, computing the structure of the scene allows to better combine information from multiple frames, resulting in high accuracies even in occluded regions. For moving regions, we compute the flow using a generic optical flow method, and combine it with the flow computed for the static regions to obtain a full optical flow field. By combining layered models of the scene with reasoning about the dynamic behavior of the real, three-dimensional world, the methods presented herein push the envelope of optical flow computation in terms of robustness, speed, and accuracy, giving state-of-the-art results on benchmarks and pointing to important future research directions for the estimation of motion in natural scenes.

Official link DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2012


Virtual Human Bodies with Clothing and Hair: From Images to Animation
Virtual Human Bodies with Clothing and Hair: From Images to Animation

Guan, P.

Brown University, Department of Computer Science, December 2012 (phdthesis)

pdf [BibTex]

2012

pdf [BibTex]


Coregistration: Supplemental Material
Coregistration: Supplemental Material

Hirshberg, D., Loper, M., Rachlin, E., Black, M. J.

(No. 4), Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, October 2012 (techreport)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


Lie Bodies: A Manifold Representation of {3D} Human Shape. Supplemental Material
Lie Bodies: A Manifold Representation of 3D Human Shape. Supplemental Material

Freifeld, O., Black, M. J.

(No. 5), Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, October 2012 (techreport)

pdf Project Page [BibTex]

pdf Project Page [BibTex]


MPI-Sintel Optical Flow Benchmark: Supplemental Material
MPI-Sintel Optical Flow Benchmark: Supplemental Material

Butler, D. J., Wulff, J., Stanley, G. B., Black, M. J.

(No. 6), Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, October 2012 (techreport)

pdf Project Page [BibTex]

pdf Project Page [BibTex]


From Pixels to Layers: Joint Motion Estimation and Segmentation
From Pixels to Layers: Joint Motion Estimation and Segmentation

Sun, D.

Brown University, Department of Computer Science, July 2012 (phdthesis)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


An Analysis of Successful Approaches to Human Pose Estimation
An Analysis of Successful Approaches to Human Pose Estimation

Lassner, C.

An Analysis of Successful Approaches to Human Pose Estimation, University of Augsburg, University of Augsburg, May 2012 (mastersthesis)

Abstract
The field of Human Pose Estimation is developing fast and lately leaped forward with the release of the Kinect system. That system reaches a very good perfor- mance for pose estimation using 3D scene information, however pose estimation from 2D color images is not solved reliably yet. There is a vast amount of pub- lications trying to reach this aim, but no compilation of important methods and solution strategies. The aim of this thesis is to fill this gap: it gives an introductory overview over important techniques by analyzing four current (2012) publications in detail. They are chosen such, that during their analysis many frequently used techniques for Human Pose Estimation can be explained. The thesis includes two introductory chapters with a definition of Human Pose Estimation and exploration of the main difficulties, as well as a detailed explanation of frequently used methods. A final chapter presents some ideas on how parts of the analyzed approaches can be recombined and shows some open questions that can be tackled in future work. The thesis is therefore a good entry point to the field of Human Pose Estimation and enables the reader to get an impression of the current state-of-the-art.

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


HUMIM Software for Articulated Tracking
HUMIM Software for Articulated Tracking

Soren Hauberg, Kim S. Pedersen

(01/2012), Department of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen, January 2012 (techreport)

Code PDF [BibTex]

Code PDF [BibTex]


A geometric framework for statistics on trees
A geometric framework for statistics on trees

Aasa Feragen, Mads Nielsen, Soren Hauberg, Pechin Lo, Marleen de Bruijne, Francois Lauze

(11/02), Department of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen, January 2012 (techreport)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


Consumer Depth Cameras for Computer Vision - Research Topics and Applications
Consumer Depth Cameras for Computer Vision - Research Topics and Applications

Fossati, A., Gall, J., Grabner, H., Ren, X., Konolige, K.

Advances in Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, Springer, 2012 (book)

workshop publisher's site [BibTex]

workshop publisher's site [BibTex]

2010


ImageFlow: Streaming Image Search
ImageFlow: Streaming Image Search

Jampani, V., Ramos, G., Drucker, S.

MSR-TR-2010-148, Microsoft Research, Redmond, 2010 (techreport)

Abstract
Traditional grid and list representations of image search results are the dominant interaction paradigms that users face on a daily basis, yet it is unclear that such paradigms are well-suited for experiences where the user‟s task is to browse images for leisure, to discover new information or to seek particular images to represent ideas. We introduce ImageFlow, a novel image search user interface that ex-plores a different alternative to the traditional presentation of image search results. ImageFlow presents image results on a canvas where we map semantic features (e.g., rele-vance, related queries) to the canvas‟ spatial dimensions (e.g., x, y, z) in a way that allows for several levels of en-gagement – from passively viewing a stream of images, to seamlessly navigating through the semantic space and ac-tively collecting images for sharing and reuse. We have implemented our system as a fully functioning prototype, and we report on promising, preliminary usage results.

url pdf link (url) [BibTex]

2010

url pdf link (url) [BibTex]

2006


Implicit Wiener Series, Part II: Regularised estimation
Implicit Wiener Series, Part II: Regularised estimation

Gehler, P., Franz, M.

(148), Max Planck Institute, 2006 (techreport)

pdf [BibTex]

2006


{HumanEva}: Synchronized video and motion capture dataset for evaluation of articulated human motion
HumanEva: Synchronized video and motion capture dataset for evaluation of articulated human motion

Sigal, L., Black, M. J.

(CS-06-08), Brown University, Department of Computer Science, 2006 (techreport)

pdf abstract [BibTex]

pdf abstract [BibTex]

1996


Mixture Models for Image Representation
Mixture Models for Image Representation

Jepson, A., Black, M.

PRECARN ARK Project Technical Report ARK96-PUB-54, March 1996 (techreport)

Abstract
We consider the estimation of local greylevel image structure in terms of a layered representation. This type of representation has recently been successfully used to segment various objects from clutter using either optical ow or stereo disparity information. We argue that the same type of representation is useful for greylevel data in that it allows for the estimation of properties for each of several different components without prior segmentation. Our emphasis in this paper is on the process used to extract such a layered representation from a given image In particular we consider a variant of the EM algorithm for the estimation of the layered model and consider a novel technique for choosing the number of layers to use. We briefly consider the use of a simple version of this approach for image segmentation and suggest two potential applications to the ARK project

pdf [BibTex]

1996

pdf [BibTex]