Department Talks

SDF-2-SDF: 3D Reconstruction of Rigid and Deformable Objects from RGB-D Videos

Talk
  • 19 October 2017 • 10:00 11:00
  • Slobodan Ilic and Mira Slavcheva
  • PS Seminar Room (N3.022)

In this talk we will address the problem of 3D reconstruction of rigid and deformable objects from a single depth video stream. Traditional 3D registration techniques, such as ICP and its variants, are wide-spread and effective, but sensitive to initialization and noise due to the underlying correspondence estimation procedure. Therefore, we have developed SDF-2-SDF, a dense, correspondence-free method which aligns a pair of implicit representations of scene geometry, e.g. signed distance fields, by minimizing their direct voxel-wise difference. In its rigid variant, we apply it for static object reconstruction via real-time frame-to-frame camera tracking and posterior multiview pose optimization, achieving higher accuracy and a wider convergence basin than ICP variants. Its extension to scene reconstruction, SDF-TAR, carries out the implicit-to-implicit registration over several limited-extent volumes anchored in the scene and runs simultaneous GPU tracking and CPU refinement, with a lower memory footprint than other SLAM systems. Finally, to handle non-rigidly moving objects, we incorporate the SDF-2-SDF energy in a variational framework, regularized by a damped approximately Killing vector field. The resulting system, KillingFusion, is able to reconstruct objects undergoing topological changes and fast inter-frame motion in near-real time.

Organizers: Fatma Güney


3D lidar mapping: an accurate and performant approach

Talk
  • 20 October 2017 • 11:30 12:30
  • Michiel Vlaminck
  • PS Seminar Room (N3.022)

In my talk I will present my work regarding 3D mapping using lidar scanners. I will give an overview of the SLAM problem and its main challenges: robustness, accuracy and processing speed. Regarding robustness and accuracy, we investigate a better point cloud representation based on resampling and surface reconstruction. Moreover, we demonstrate how it can be incorporated in an ICP-based scan matching technique. Finally, we elaborate on globally consistent mapping using loop closures. Regarding processing speed, we propose the integration of our scan matching in a multi-resolution scheme and a GPU-accelerated implementation using our programming language Quasar.

Organizers: Simon Donne

  • Anton Van Den Hengel
  • Aquarium

Visual Question Answering is one of the applications of Deep Learning that is pushing towards real Artificial Intelligence. It turns the typical deep learning process around by only defining the task to be carried out after the training has taken place, which changes the task fundamentally. We have developed a range of strategies for incorporating other information sources into deep learning-based methods, and the process taken a step towards developing algorithms which learn how to use other algorithms to solve a problem, rather than solving it directly. This talk thus covers some of the high-level questions about the types of challenges Deep Learning can be applied to, and how we might separate the things its good at from those that it’s not.

Organizers: Siyu Tang


  • Yeara Kozlov
  • Aquarium

Creating convincing human facial animation is challenging. Face animation is often hand-crafted by artists separately from body motion. Alternatively, if the face animation is derived from motion capture, it is typically performed while the actor is relatively still. Recombining the isolated face animation with body motion is non-trivial and often results in uncanny results if the body dynamics are not properly reflected on the face (e.g. cheeks wiggling when running). In this talk, I will discuss the challenges of human soft tissue simulation and control. I will then present our method for adding physical effects to facial blendshape animation. Unlike previous methods that try to add physics to face rigs, our method can combine facial animation and rigid body motion consistently while preserving the original animation as closely as possible. Our novel simulation framework uses the original animation as per-frame rest-poses without adding spurious forces. We also propose the concept of blendmaterials to give artists an intuitive means to control the changing material properties due to muscle activation.

Organizers: Timo Bolkart


Deep Learning for stereo matching and related tasks

Talk
  • 12 July 2017 • 11:00 12:00
  • Matteo Poggi
  • PS Seminar Room (N3.022)

Recently, deep learning proved to be successful also on low level vision tasks such as stereo matching. Another recent trend in this latter field is represented by confidence measures, with increasing effectiveness when coupled with random forest classifiers or CNNs. Despite their excellent accuracy in outliers detection, few other applications rely on them. In the first part of the talk, we'll take a look at the latest proposal in terms of confidence measures for stereo matching, as well as at some novel methodologies exploiting these very accurate cues. In the second part, we'll talk about GC-net, a deep network currently representing the state-of-the-art on the KITTI datasets, and its extension to motion stereo processing.

Organizers: Yiyi Liao


  • Seong Joon Oh
  • Aquarium

Growth of the internet and social media has spurred the sharing and dissemination of personal data at large scale. At the same time, recent developments in computer vision has enabled unseen effectiveness and efficiency in automated recognition. It is clear that visual data contains private information that can be mined, yet the privacy implications of sharing such data have been less studied in computer vision community. In the talk, I will present some key results from our study of the implications of the development of computer vision on the identifiability in social media, and an analysis of existing and new anonymisation techniques. In particular, we show that adversarial image perturbations (AIP) introduce human invisible perturbations on the input image that effectively misleads a recogniser. They are far more aesthetic and effective compared to e.g. face blurring. The core limitation, however, is that AIPs are usually generated against specific target recogniser(s), and it is hard to guarantee the performance against uncertain, potentially adaptive recognisers. As a first step towards dealing with the uncertainty, we have introduced a game theoretical framework to obtain the user’s privacy guarantee independent of the randomly chosen recogniser (within some fixed set).

Organizers: Siyu Tang


  • Matthias Niessner
  • PS Seminar Room (N3.022)

In the recent years, commodity 3D sensors have become easily and widely available. These advances in sensing technology have spawned significant interest in using captured 3D data for mapping and semantic understanding of 3D environments. In this talk, I will give an overview of our latest research in the context of 3D reconstruction of indoor environments. I will further talk about the use of 3D data in the context of modern machine learning techniques. Specifically, I will highlight the importance of training data, and how can we efficiently obtain labeled and self-supervised ground truth training datasets from captured 3D content. Finally, I will show a selection of state-of-the-art deep learning approaches, including discriminative semantic labeling of 3D scenes and generative reconstruction techniques.

Organizers: Despoina Paschalidou


  • Alexey Dosovitskiy
  • PS Seminar Room (N3.022)

Our world is dynamic and three-dimensional. Understanding the 3D layout of scenes and the motion of objects is crucial for successfully operating in such an environment. I will talk about two lines of recent research in this direction. One is on end-to-end learning of motion and 3D structure: optical flow estimation, binocular and monocular stereo, direct generation of large volumes with convolutional networks. The other is on sensorimotor control in immersive three-dimensional environments, learned from experience or from demonstration.

Organizers: Lars Mescheder Aseem Behl


From Camera Synchronization to Deep Learning

Talk
  • 06 June 2017 • 14:00 15:00
  • Nadine Rüegg
  • PS greenhouse

We transfer a monocular motion stereo 3D reconstruction algorithm from a mobile device (Google Project Tango Tablet) to a rigidly mounted external camera of higher image resolution. A reliable camera synchronization is crucial for the usability of the tablets IMU data and thus a time synchronization method developed. It is based on the joint movement of the cameras. In a second project, we move from outdoor video scenes to aerial images and strive to segment them into polygonal shapes. While most existing approaches address the problem of automated generation of online maps as a pixel-wise segmentation task, we instead frame this problem as constructing polygons representing objects. An approach based on Faster R-CNN, a successful object detection algorithm, is presented.

Organizers: Siyu Tang


Human Motion Models

Talk
  • 31 May 2017 • 15:00 16:00
  • Partha Ghosh
  • Aquarium

We propose a new architecture for the learning of predictive spatio-temporal motion models from data alone. Our approach, dubbed the Dropout Autoencoder LSTM, is capable of synthesizing natural looking motion sequences over long time horizons without catastrophic drift or mo- tion degradation. The model consists of two components, a 3-layer recurrent neural network to model temporal aspects and a novel auto-encoder that is trained to implicitly recover the spatial structure of the human skeleton via randomly removing information about joints during train- ing time. This Dropout Autoencoder (D-AE) is then used to filter each predicted pose of the LSTM, reducing accumulation of error and hence drift over time. Furthermore, we propose new evaluation protocols to assess the quality of synthetic motion sequences even for which no groundtruth data exists. The proposed protocols can be used to assess generated sequences of arbitrary length. Finally, we evaluate our proposed method on two of the largest motion- capture datasets available to date and show that our model outperforms the state-of-the-art on a variety of actions, including cyclic and acyclic motion, and that it can produce natural looking sequences over longer time horizons than previous methods.

Organizers: Gerard Pons-Moll


  • Endri Dibra
  • Aquarium

Estimating 3D shape from monocular 2D images is a challenging and ill-posed problem. Some of these challenges can be alleviated if 3D shape priors are taken into account. In the field of human body shape estimation, research has shown that accurate 3D body estimations can be achieved through optimization, by minimizing error functions on image cues, such as e.g. the silhouette. These methods though, tend to be slow and typically require manual interactions (e.g. for pose estimation). In this talk, we present some recent works that try to overcome such limitations, achieving interactive rates, by learning mappings from 2D image to 3D shape spaces, utilizing data-driven priors, generated from statistically learned parametric shape models. We demonstrate this, either by extracting handcrafted features or directly utilizing CNN-s. Furthermore, we introduce the notion and application of cross-modal or multi-view learning, where abundance of data coming from various views representing the same object at training time, can be leveraged in a semi-supervised setting to boost estimations at test time. Additionally, we show similar applications of the above techniques for the task of 3D garment estimation from a single image.

Organizers: Gerard Pons-Moll


  • Sven Dickinson
  • Green-House (PS)

Human observers can classify photographs of real-world scenes after only a very brief exposure to the image (Potter & Levy, 1969; Thorpe, Fize, Marlot, et al., 1996; VanRullen & Thorpe, 2001). Line drawings of natural scenes have been shown to capture essential structural information required for successful scene categorization (Walther et al., 2011). Here, we investigate how the spatial relationships between lines and line segments in the line drawings affect scene classification. In one experiment, we tested the effect of removing either the junctions or the middle segments between junctions. Surprisingly, participants performed better when shown the middle segments (47.5%) than when shown the junctions (42.2%). It appeared as if the images with middle segments tended to maintain the most parallel/locally symmetric portions of the contours. In order to test this hypothesis, in a second experiment, we either removed the most symmetric half of the contour pixels or the least symmetric half of the contour pixels using a novel method of measuring the local symmetry of each contour pixel in the image. Participants were much better at categorizing images containing the most symmetric contour pixels (49.7%) than the least symmetric (38.2%).  Thus, results from both experiments demonstrate that local contour symmetry is a crucial organizing principle in complex real-world scenes. Joint work with John Wilder (UofT CS, Psych), Morteza Rezanejad (McGill CS), Kaleem Siddiqi (McGill CS), Allan Jepson (UofT CS), and Dirk Bernhardt-Walther (UofT Psych), to be presented at VSS 2017.

Organizers: Ahmed Osman